Natural Gas

House of Reps, TSA Tackle Cybersecurity in the Energy Industry

This week, the House of Representatives approved three measures aimed at improving cybersecurity in the energy industry:

  • Energy Emergency Leadership Act. This Bill requires the Secretary of Energy to assign energy emergency and cybersecurity responsibilities to an Assistant Secretary, including responsibilities regarding infrastructure and cybersecurity.

 

 

  • Cyber Sense Act of 2021. This Bill encourages coordination between the Department of Energy and electric utilities. It also requires the Department of Energy to test products and technologies intended for use in the bulk power system.

These measures, which will now move to the Senate, are in response to the slew of recent cybersecurity attacks against critical U.S.

Government Races to Secure Critical Infrastructure in Wake of Colonial Pipeline Ransomware Attack

One of the nation’s largest pipelines, Colonial Pipeline, which carries 45 percent of the East Coast’s fuel supplies, was forced to shut down on May 7 after it was targeted by a ransomware attack. Ransomware is a type of malware where criminal groups encrypt data, effectively “holding it hostage,” until the victim pays a ransom.

Colonial Pipeline resumed operations on May 15. However, the cyberattack has sparked public panic and outcry as parts of the country experience fuel shortages and fuel prices rise to their highest levels in nearly seven years. The incident has also renewed efforts government-wide to strengthen security of U.S. pipelines and the power grid. On May 11, the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce reintroduced bipartisan legislation aimed at bolstering the Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) ability to respond to cybersecurity threats to U.S. energy infrastructure. Among the several measures introduced were:

(1) The Pipeline and LNG Facility Cybersecurity Preparedness Act, which would require DOE to implement

FERC Declares Concurrent Jurisdiction with Bankruptcy Courts Over Rejections of Natural Gas Transportation Agreements

On June 22, 2020, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”) issued an order in response to a Petition for Declaratory Order (“Petition”) filed by ETC Tiger Pipeline, LLC (“ETC Tiger”), finding that FERC has concurrent jurisdiction with United States Bankruptcy Courts to review and dispose of natural gas transportation agreements sought to be rejected through bankruptcy.[1]

The Petition, filed on May 19, 2020, requested that FERC find that it has concurrent jurisdiction with Bankruptcy Courts under sections 4 and 5 of the Natural Gas Act (“NGA”) with respect to natural gas transportation agreements between ETC Tiger and Chesapeake Energy Marketing, L.L.C. (“Chesapeake”) and that FERC approval of any abrogation or modification of the agreements is statutorily required.  Specifically, ETC Tiger requested three Commission declarations:

  1. The natural gas transportation agreements between ETC Tiger and Chesapeake are FERC-jurisdictional agreements reflecting filed rates approved by FERC pursuant to its exclusive jurisdiction under the NGA;
  2. If Chesapeake seeks rejection of the agreements